Department of Mathematical Sciences

MATH 240 HOMEPAGE

SPRING 2018

LINEAR ALGEBRA AND APPLICATIONS (4) Matrix algebra and solutions of systems of linear equations, matrix inversion, determinants. Vector spaces, linear dependence, basis and dimension, subspaces. Inner products, Gram-Schmidt process. Linear transformations, matrices of a linear transformation. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Applications. Constructing and writing mathematical proofs. A transition between beginning calculus courses and upper-level mathematics courses.
PRQ: MATH 232, Calculus III

TEXT: Bernard Kolman and David R.Hill, Elementary Linear Algebra, 9th Edition, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, 2008.

SYLLABUS: The course will cover most of Chapters 1-7 of the text.

COURSE OBJECTIVES: Students will develop computational skills in working with linear transformations and the matrices used to represent them. However, more of the course will focus on non-computational issues such as reasoning and constructing proofs. This course is intended as a transition between the beginning calculus courses and upper level courses in mathematics.

CALCULATORS: This course is not focused on numerical computation. Students may wish to use calculators or computers as a study aid, but no electronic devices of any kind will be allowed on exams. See how a calculator can give you a completely wrong answer. Techniques from numerical linear algebra are covered in a subsequent course, MATH 434.

GRADING: Grades will be based on exams, quizzes, and homework. There will be

  • Three in-class exams, 100 points each
  • Homework and/or Quizzes, approximately 100 points total (may vary by section)
  • Final exam, 200 points

Your professor will provide more specific information about grading policies and exam dates for your section.

FINAL EXAM: The final exam will be a comprehensive, departmental examination. It is scheduled as a mass exam, on Thursday, May 10, 8:00-9:50 a.m. All sections of this course will take the same final exam at the same time.

WITHDRAWAL: The last day for undergraduates to withdraw from a full-session course is Friday, March 9, 2018.

LECTURES AND EXAMS: This is the tentative schedule for lectures and exams.


Week of      Sections 
1/15        Martin Luther King Jr. Day, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3

1/22        1.4, 1.5, 2.1, 2.2

1/29        2.3, 3.1, 3.2

2/5         3.3, 3.4, 3.5, Exam 1    

2/12        4.2, 4.3, 4.4

2/19        4.5, 4.6

2/26        4.7, 4.8

3/5         4.9, Exam 2

3/12        Spring Break

3/19        5.1, 5.3, 5.4

3/26        5.4, 5.5

4/2         6.1, 6.2

4/9         6.3, 6.5

4/16        6.5, Exam 3, 7.1

4/23        7.2, 7.3

4/30        Review

FINAL EXAM: Thursday, May 10, 8:00-9:50 a.m.

HOMEWORK PROBLEMS: These are the suggested homework problems. The assigned homework problems may vary by section.

   |Section|Page|Problems

     1.1      8   2  3  5  10 11 14 15 34
     1.2     19   5  8  13 19
     1.3     30   5  7  14 23 28 31 33 36 43 49
     1.4     40   3  5  10 22 32 36
     1.5     52   3  11 17 21 22 24 32 33 35 36 40 51 

     2.1     94   1  3  5  8 
     2.2    113   1  5  7  14 23 31
     2.3    124   2  5  8  12 13 17 24 29 

     3.1    145   2  3  5  8  12 
     3.2    154   1  8  9  10 14 15 23 24 30 32 
     3.3    164   1  4  5  12 
     3.4    169   2  4  14
     3.5    172   3  5  

     4.2    196   1  3  6  23 24 25 
     4.3    205   1  4  5  13 15 17 19 23 24 
     4.4    215   1  3  4  8  12 13
     4.5    226   1  2  3  12 13 23 24 
     4.6    242   8  10 20 28 30 32 44 47
     4.7    251   4  9 
     4.8    267   6  7  10 15 23 24 26 29 37 42 
     4.9    282   2  7  14 18 34 35 45

     5.1    297   6  10 18 25 
     5.3    317   7  14 17 19 20 30 31 41 
     5.4    329   2  5  11 15 21 23 
     5.5    348   2  7  9  11 15 19 

     6.1    372   2  4  8  9  12 13 16 17 32 34
     6.2    387   1  8  10 12 16 20 25 
     6.3    397   1  8  9  22 
     6.5    413   1  3  6  7  11 

     7.1    450   2  7  12 17 21 
     7.2    461   6  11 18 19 26 
     7.3    475   1  2  3  4  8  11 16 19 

REVIEW: Chapter Summaries from the textbook by Kolman.
Previous final exams: Fall 2002, Fall 2004, Fall 2008, Spring 2011, Spring 2016, Fall 2009 with solutions.

ACADEMIC CONDUCT: Academic honesty and mutual respect (student with student and instructor with student) are expected in this course. Mutual respect means being on time for class and not leaving early, being prepared to give full attention to class work, not reading newspapers or other material in class, not using cell phones or pagers during class time, and not looking at another student's work during exams. Academic misconduct, as defined by the Student Judicial Code, will not be treated lightly.

ACCESSIBILITY STATEMENT: Northern Illinois University is committed to providing an accessible educational environment in collaboration with the Disability Resource Center (DRC). Any student requiring an academic accommodation due to a disability should let his or her faculty member know as soon as possible. Students who need academic accommodations based on the impact of a disability will be encouraged to contact the DRC if they have not done so already. The DRC is located on the 4th floor of the Health Services Building, and can be reached at 815-753-1303 or drc@niu.edu.